Paper

General Paper Facts
· 4100 kilowatts saved per ton recycled
· 60 pounds of air pollution reduced per ton recycled
Source: National Polymers Inc.

By Recycling 1 ton of paper you save:
· 17 trees
· 6953 gallons of water
· 463 gallons of oil
· 587 pounds of air pollution
· 3.06 cubic yards of landfill space
· 4077 Kilowatt hours of energy
Source: Weyerhauser info

In 1996, 42.3 million tons of paper were recycled in America.
Source: “Recycling and Buy Recycled Fact Sheets” America Recycles Day

The overall paper and paperboard recovery rate was 44.7 percent for 1996. The total weight of paper and paperboard recovered in 1996 was 42.3 million tons, or 295 pounds per American citizen.
Source: American Forest and Paper Association

In the manufacturing process of Recycled Paper:
· 74% Less air pollution is generated
· 35% Less water pollution is generated
· 58% Less water is required
· 64% Less energy is required
· 31 billion gallons of water could be saved every month by installing water efficiency shower heads in our homes.
Source: Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

Paper and paperboard account for more than 60% of all materials diverted from the municipal solid waste stream for recycling and composting. In 1993, nearly 36 million tons of paper were recovered in the United States-twice as much as in 1980. More than one of every two newspapers, nearly 60% of all corrugated material and one third of all paper and paperboard packaging ( compared to 12% of all other packaging) are being recovered. One third of all paper collected in the world is recovered in the United States, where an average of 267 pounds in now recovered annually by each citizen (compared to 257 pounds per person in Japan). In all, Americans now recover 40% of all paper used- achieving a goal the industry set for 1995 two years ahead of schedule. Importantly, the U.S. paper industry has set its sights even higher with a new goal to recover- for recycling and reuse – one half of all paper used in the year 2000.
Source: American Forest and Paper Association

Paper Consumption Statistics
Paper Producers
Expected wood pulp production in millions of metric tons in 1998.

Countries Metric Tons
U.S. 62
Canada 29
Japan 15
Finland 13
Sweden 12
CIS* 11
Brazil 7
Indonesia 6
France 3.5
China 3.3
Although their overall pulp production is still small, these countries have seen huge increases between 1995 and their estimated capacity in 2000:

Countries Percentage
Thailand 165.6%
Indonesia 123.0%
Vietnam 92.3%
Romania 60.3%
Australia 58.4%

Paper Users
Top consumers of paper and paperboard per person in pounds for 1995

Countries Weight (pounds)
U.S. 730
Finland 669
Belgium 565
Japan 526
Canada 505
Singapore 502
Taiwan 492
Switzerland 476
Denmark 471
New Zealand 468
Brazil 77
China 48
Indonesia 31
CIS* 28

*Russia and 11 states of the former Soviet Union
Sources: Worldwatch Institute, Pulp & Paper International,
International Institute for Environment and Development

What goes into paper?
· 37% Managed regenerated forests that have been logged and then encouraged to grow again by natural means, such as seeding
· 29% Industrial pulp plantations that produce fast-growing trees such as some pines and eucalyptus.
· 1% Tropical rain forest
· 1% Original temperate forests (United States, parts of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Argentina, Europe and China)
· 15% Original boreal forests (Alaska, Canada, Russia and Scandinavia)
· 17% Unmanaged naturally regenerated forests
Newspapers
Old newspapers are used again to make new newsprint, as well as other products. In 1992, of the 12.8 million tons of newsprint used in the United States, approximately 1.4 million tons went back into the manufacture of new newspaper.
Source: Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

If all morning newspapers read around the country were recycled, 41,000 trees would be saved daily and 6 million tons of waste would never end up in landfills
Source: Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

Newspaper Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Facts:
Generated: 13.1 million tons, or 6.3% of MSW by weight.
· 10.7 million tons of this are newspaper and 2.4 million tons are advertising inserts printed on newsprint.
· 99 pounds per person per year.
· 118 newspages per pound.
Recycled: 7 million tons for a 5.3% recycling rate.
· Industry data show 7.7 million tons recovered for a 61% recovery rate in 1995 and 7.4 million tons recovered for a 63% recovery rate in 1996.
Recycled Content: 26% of the fiber in American newspapers comes from ONP.
· 27 states have voluntary or mandatory requirements that newspapers sold in those states contain prescribed amounts of recycled fiber.
Incinerated or Landfilled: 6.1 million tons or 4.1% of discarded MSW by weight.
Landfill Volume: 17.6 million cubic yards or 4.3% of landfilled MSW by weight in 1993.
Density: 12″ stack weighs 35 pounds.
· Loose, unbaled newspapers weigh 360-500 pounds per cubic yard.
· Baled newspapers weigh 720-1000 pounds per cubic yard.
· Landfilled newspapers weigh 800 pounds per cubic yard.
Source Reduction: Newspaper standard basis weight declined from 32 pounds per 3000 square feet in 1974 to 30 pounds per 3000 square feet in 1995.
· Average number of newspages per pound increased form 93 in 1985 to 118 in 1995.
Sources: Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States
Bill Moore, Moore and Associates ( Atlanta)
Measurements Standards and Reporting Guidelines, National Recycling Coalition
NSWMA’s Waste Recyclers Council: Processing and Collection Cost Studies
Paper Recycler, April, May , 1997
Newspaper Association of America ( Falls Church, Va.)
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, 1990
Scrap Specifications Circular 1996: Guidelines for Paper Stock:
Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries ( Washington, D.C.)
Waste Age’s Recycling Times

Newspaper Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Facts:
Generated: 13.1 million tons, or 6.3% of MSW by weight.
· 10.7 million tons of this are newspaper and 2.4 million tons are advertising inserts printed on newsprint.
· 99 pounds per person per year.
· 118 newspages per pound.
Recycled: 7 million tons for a 5.3% recycling rate.
· Industry data show 7.7 million tons recovered for a 61% recovery rate in 1995 and 7.4 million tons recovered for a 63% recovery rate in 1996.
Recycled Content: 26% of the fiber in American newspapers comes from ONP.
· 27 states have voluntary or mandatory requirements that newspapers sold in those states contain prescribed amounts of recycled fiber.
Incinerated or Landfilled: 6.1 million tons or 4.1% of discarded MSW by weight.
Landfill Volume: 17.6 million cubic yards or 4.3% of landfilled MSW by weight in 1993.
Density: 12″ stack weighs 35 pounds.
· Loose, unbaled newspapers weigh 360-500 pounds per cubic yard.
· Baled newspapers weigh 720-1000 pounds per cubic yard.
· Landfilled newspapers weigh 800 pounds per cubic yard.
Source Reduction: Newspaper standard basis weight declined from 32 pounds per 3000 square feet in 1974 to 30 pounds per 3000 square feet in 1995.
· Average number of newspages per pound increased form 93 in 1985 to 118 in 1995.
Sources: Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States
Bill Moore, Moore and Associates ( Atlanta)
Measurements Standards and Reporting Guidelines, National Recycling Coalition
(Alexandria, Va. ) 1990
NSWMA’s Waste Recyclers Council: Processing and Collection Cost Studies
Paper Recycler, April, May , 1997
Newspaper Association of America ( Falls Church, Va.)
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, 1990
Scrap Specifications Circular 1996: Guidelines for Paper Stock:
Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries ( Washington, D.C.)
Waste Age’s Recycling Times